Some Descendants of Samuel Tate of Claiborne County, Tennessee
and James McDonald Tate of Hamilton County, Tennessee

 


Compiled by Joshua C. Tate
(joshua.tate@aya.yale.edu)

Revised 2008

FIRST GENERATION:


SAMUEL TATE, b. ca. 1735, d. 1812

Samuel Tate was a Southern pioneer, one of the earliest settlers in present-day Tennessee.  He lived in Washington County, the mother county of Tennessee, from at least 1778 until the 1790s, at which point he briefly relocated to Lee County, Virginia.  In 1797, he moved to present-day Claiborne County, Tennessee, (n. 1) died there in or before 1812, (n. 2) and had a son named John Tate (n. 3) and at least one other son, possibly named Robert Tate or Samuel Tate, Jr. (n. 4)  The connections to Washington County, Lee County, and Claiborne County are well-established, but there is much still to learn, and the search is complicated by the fact that there was more than one Samuel Tate along the Southern frontier during this period.

 

It is not yet known for certain where Samuel Tate was born, or where he lived before migrating to present-day Tennessee.  According to an 1895 biography of Samuel Tate’s great-grandson, William Elbert Tate, Sr. our Tate family is of Scots-Irish origin. (n. 5) Tate is a common name among the Scots-Irish, i.e., Protestants of Scottish ancestry who settled in Northern Ireland (Ulster) before coming to America.  Most Scots-Irish immigrants landed at the port of Philadelphia, and lived in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, or northern Virginia before overcrowding forced them to head for the frontier.  Thus, it is possible that our Samuel Tate was born in Northern Ireland, or in one of these mid-Atlantic states.

 

Although the evidence is not conclusive, it is likely that our Samuel lived in Rowan County, North Carolina before coming to present-day Tennessee.  Land records from Rowan County show that a Samuel Tate lived there in the 1760s, and may have left the county in 1767. (n. 6)  A Rowan County deed from 1767 says that this Samuel Tate’s wife was named “Darcus.” (n. 7)  We know that our Samuel Tate’s son, John Tate, had two illegitimate children, a son named Samuel and a daughter (already married to Thomas Simpson) named “Darkess,” whom he legitimized in 1816. (n. 8)  The boy was obviously named after John’s father, and the girl could have been named after John’s mother.  Both “Darcus” and “Darkess” are variant spellings of the female name Dorcas, and one might guess that John thought of the name Dorcas for his first daughter because that was his mother’s name.  Although there were several men named Samuel Tate living in the South during this period, the Samuel in Rowan County is the only Samuel Tate of the period known to have married a woman named Dorcas.  Dorcas was a more common name in the eighteenth century than today, but it was not one of the most common names. (n. 9)  Thus, circumstantial evidence suggests that the Samuel Tate who appears in the Rowan County records is ours.

 

When Daniel Boone, a former resident of Rowan County, cut the historic Wilderness Road from the Holston River to Kentucky, he was accompanied by a Samuel Tate.  A DAR marker at Fort Boonesborough, the settlement Boone founded, names Samuel Tate and his son (identified as Samuel Tate, Jr.) along with Boone and several other pioneers who helped open Kentucky for settlement. (n. 10)  On April 1, 1775, Boone wrote to Col. Henderson to say, “On March the 28 as we were hunting for provisions we found Samuel Tate’s son, who gave us an account that the Indians fired on their camp on the 27 day.” (n. 11)  It is not certain that this is our Samuel Tate, but that conclusion is supported by the fact that a Samuel Tate appears in the militia list for Rowan County in 1759 along with Daniel Boone, (n. 12) and a Sam Tate witnessed the marriage bond between Jane Van Cleave and Daniel’s brother Squire Boone in Rowan County on July 11, 1765. (n. 13)  The Samuel Tate who accompanied Daniel Boone is likely to have been the old acquaintance of the Boone family from Rowan County. (n. 14)

 

Interviews with the Boone family in the nineteenth century revealed several old family stories about Samuel Tate and Daniel Boone.  One story relates how Samuel Tate became jealous when Daniel Boone brought some rye to his wife while Samuel was absent on a long hunt.  Because of Samuel’s ingratitude, Daniel gave him “a severe flogging.” (n. 15)  Another story relates that Samuel and Daniel got into a boxing match following a dispute over hunting territory. (n. 16)  These stories often refer to Samuel as an “old” hunter, but they were recorded about a century after the events occurred, and are not likely to be particularly reliable in their details; it is likely that our Samuel was about the same age as Daniel Boone.  The stories do, however, provide additional evidence that Daniel Boone was acquainted with the Samuel Tate of Rowan County.

 

In short, it seems likely that it was the Samuel Tate of Rowan County who accompanied Boone, and this appears to be our Samuel Tate. (n. 17)  The son referred to by Daniel Boone in the letter to Col. Henderson and memorialized in the DAR marker could be Samuel’s established son John Tate, Sr., or perhaps the Robert Tate mentioned in later records who may be a son of Samuel. (n. 18)  Records indicate that a John Tate and a Robert Tate were present at Fort Boonesborough before 1780 and that Samuel Tate was present at the founding in 1775. (n. 19)  Further research on the history of Fort Boonesborough and the Boone expedition may shed light on this problem.

 

In the late eighteenth century, the area known today as Tennessee was still part of North Carolina.  Washington County, North Carolina was the first county created in this area, in 1778, followed the next year by Sullivan County. (n. 20)  Everyone who lived in present-day Tennessee during the earliest period lived in Washington or Sullivan County.  Samuel Tate appears in many documents from Washington County in the 1770s and 1780s.  For example, in 1778, Samuel was fined twenty pounds for “insulting the Court.” (n. 21)  This reference establishes the presence of Samuel in Washington County by 1778. 

 

Samuel seems to have frequently been in trouble with the law, although his infractions apparently were not serious.  In 1781, Samuel was fined the exorbitant sum of ten thousand pounds:  enough to buy all of Washington County at that time. (n. 22)  This was probably just a threat, as the court later instructed the sheriff to forbear collecting the fine. (n. 23)  In 1789, Samuel Tate was found not guilty after being charged with assault and battery. (n. 24)

                                                                 

A 1783 deed records a land transfer from John Hoskins and his wife Ruth to Samuel Tate of Washington County, North Carolina. (n. 25)  This deed is witnessed by a Thomas Hoskins; coincidentally, Samuel Tate later sold some land in Claiborne County to a Thomas Hoskins. (n. 26)  There are many other deeds pertaining to Samuel in the Washington County records; he seems to have been something of a land speculator.   Some of Samuel’s land was situated in present-day Carter County, which was separated from Washington County in 1796.  Subsequent land transactions confirm that the Samuel Tate who owned land in Washington County later relocated to present-day Claiborne County, and thus must be our Samuel Tate. (n. 27)

 

It is possible that our Samuel Tate served in the Revolutionary War.  The North Carolina Revolutionary Army Accounts for soldiers residing in Washington and Sullivan Counties list a Samuel Tate and a Robert Tate. (n. 28)  There were two soldiers named Samuel Tate who fought at the pivotal Battle of King’s Mountain in 1780, a battle that involved many soldiers from Washington and Sullivan counties. (n. 29)  Our Samuel Tate is not registered as a patriot with the DAR; however, this could simply mean that no one has yet tried to join the organization based on his service.

                                                                                               

Samuel Tate had a son named John Tate, and at least one other son, possibly named Robert Tate or Samuel Tate, Jr.  Thus, we may begin our family tree:

 

1.  Samuel Tate, b. abt. 1735, d. abt. 1812 in Claiborne County, TN.

m. [?] Dorcas ___ (b. abt. 1740, d. prob. bef. 1778). (n. 30)

Children of Samuel Tate and Dorcas ___:

2.         John Tate, b. abt. 1760 prob. in Rowan County, NC, m. Elizabeth Parkeson (b. abt. 1770, d. bef. 1826) in Washington County, NC (later TN) on Feb. 18, 1789, d. abt. 1826.

3.         ___ Tate, b. abt. 1760-1780, d. after 1787. (n. 31)

 

           

SECOND GENERATION: 

JOHN TATE, SR., b. abt. 1760, d. abt. 1826

 

John Tate, Sr.’s birth date is unknown, but, based on the birth dates of his children, it seems likely that he was born around 1760, at which point his father was probably living in Rowan County, North Carolina.  Like his father, John Tate, Sr. lived in Washington County, North Carolina in the late eighteenth century, although more than one John Tate appears in the Washington County records from the 1780s and 1790s. (n. 32)  In a deed from Washington County dated Nov. 17, 1790, John Tate purchased a tract of land in present-day Carter County, Tennessee (then Washington County), which he had entered in 1778, adjacent to land owned by Samuel Tate. (n. 33)  John and his wife sold this land to Richard White on March 11, 1797, at which point they were still residents of Carter County. (n. 34)  Thus, it is likely that the children born before between 1790 and 1797 were born in present-day Carter County, which between 1790 and June 1, 1796 was part of Washington County in the U.S. Territory South of the River Ohio.

 

As discussed above, John Tate had two children born out of wedlock—Samuel and Dorcas—whom he later legitimized. (n. 35)  It is not known why John Tate did not marry the mother of these children; it is possible that he simply never went to the trouble of finding a preacher, or that the mother died before he could marry her.  In any event, it is clear that John later married and that his subsequent children were legitimate. (n. 36)  On Feb. 18, 1789, John Tate married Elizabeth Parkeson in Washington County. (n. 37)  She probably predeceased him, as she is not mentioned in any of the deeds executed by John Tate at the end of his life.

 

John Tate, Sr. was a slaveholder.  In 1811, he published an ad in the Carthage, TN newspaper seeking the return of a runaway slave named Harry whom he had rented for $420. (n. 38)  Toward the end of his life, he had twelve slaves working on his plantation. (n. 39)  In 1826, John Tate, Sr. gave his children slaves as well as horses and tracts of land, “in consideration of . . . paternal love and affection.” (n. 40)  These Tates lived in a world where slavery was an accepted and unquestioned part of agricultural life.

 

John Tate had at least five children by Elizabeth Parkeson, in addition to his two legitimized children. (n. 41)  Thus, we may continue our family tree:

 

2.  John Tate,  b. abt. 1760 prob. in Rowan County, North Carolina, d. abt. 1826.

Children of John Tate and unknown consort (born out of wedlock):

4.         Dorcas Tate, b. abt. 1780s in prob. Washington County, NC (later TN), m. Thomas Simpson, d. after 1836. (n. 42)

5.         Samuel Tate, b. abt. 1780s in prob. Washington County, NC (later TN), d. abt. 1818. (n. 43)

m.  Elizabeth Parkeson (b. abt. 1770, d. bef. 1826) in Washington County, NC (later TN) on Feb. 18, 1789. (n. 44)

Children of John Tate and Elizabeth Parkeson:                                                              

6.         Mary Tate, b. abt. 1795 prob. in Washington County, U.S. Territory South of the River Ohio (later Carter County, TN), m. John Reagan, d. after 1850.

7.         Vincent Benham Tate, b. abt. 1795 prob. in Washington County, U.S. Territory South of the River Ohio (later Carter County, TN), m. Sarah Hall Whiteside in abt. 1818, d. bef. 1836. (n. 45) 

8.         John Tate, Jr., b. 29 Feb. 1796 prob. in Washington County, U.S. Territory South of the River Ohio (later Carter County, TN), m (1). ___ McDonald (d. 1822 prob. in Tennessee) abt. 1815-20 in Overton County, TN, m (2). Eliza Jane Weir (b. abt. 1815, d. 5 Oct. 1877 in Jacksonville, AL) on 30 Jul. 1829 in McMinn County, TN, m (3). Cynthia Hamilton (b. 23 Oct 1813 in TN, d. 13 Dec. 1897 in Desert, TX) on 17 Oct. 1839 prob. in McMinn or Monroe County, TN, d. 6 Jan. 1869 in Collin County, TX. (n. 46)

9.         Alfred Carter Tate, b. 14 Nov. 1797 prob. in Tennessee, m. Elizabeth McDonald (b. 12 Jul. 1805) on 4 Sep. 1820, d. 31 Aug. 1867 poss. in TX. (n. 47)

10.       Robert Tate, b. abt. 1804 prob. in Tennessee, d. 1837 in McMinn County, TN. (n. 48)

 

THIRD GENERATION: 

REV. JOHN TATE, JR., b. 29 Feb. 1796, d. 6 Jan. 1869

 

John Tate, Jr. was born near the end of the eighteenth century, probably in present-day Carter County, Tennessee, and survived to see most of the nineteenth.  Following a camp meeting in 1820 at the Cave Springs Presbyterian Church, the young John “professed religion” and decided to enter the ministry. (n. 49)  For the rest of his life, John would be known as the Rev. John Tate, a minister of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 

As a man of the cloth, the Rev. John Tate moved many times, first to McMinn County, TN, (n. 50) then to Monroe County, TN, (n. 51) and finally to Collin County, TX. (n. 52)  The Rev. John served as a commissioner to several assemblies of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. (n. 53)  Like his father, the Rev. John was a slaveholder.  He seems to have sold his slaves in the 1830s, but he is listed as owning several slaves in 1860. (n. 54)  Married three times, John outlived his first wife and divorced his second, only to be survived by a third.  Continuing our family tree, we have:

 

8.  John Tate, Jr., b. 29 Feb. 1796 prob. in Washington County, U.S. Territory South of the River Ohio (later Carter County, Tennessee), d. 6 Jan. 1869 in Collin County, TX.

m (1). ___ McDonald (d. 1822 prob. in Tennessee) abt. 1815-20 in Overton County, TN. (n. 55)

Children of John Tate, Jr. and ___ McDonald:

11.       Margaret Simpson Tate b. abt. 1818 prob. in Overton County, TN, m. Nelson Ely (b. 22 Aug 1812 in Overton, County, TN, d. 25 Nov 1879 in Grayson County, TX) abt. 1836 in TN, d. aft. 1860. (n. 56)

12.       Nancy Jane Tate b. abt. 1820 prob. in Overton County, TN, m. Willis Holford (b. 1820 in TN, d. 1899) abt. 1840 in TN, d. aft. 1870.

13.       James McDonald Tate b. Sept. 18, 1822 prob. in Overton County, TN, m. Jane Catherine Pickel (b. Sept. 3, 1828 in TN, d. Feb. 7, 1883 in TN) on Sept. 30, 1847 in Monroe County, TN, d. March 2, 1858 in Hamilton County, TN. (n. 57)

m (2). Eliza Jane Weir (b. abt. 1815, d. 5 Oct. 1877 in Jacksonville, AL) on 30 Jul. 1829 in McMinn County, TN. (n. 58)

Child of John Tate, Jr. and Eliza Jane Weir:

14.       George Weir Tate, b. 21 Sept. 1830 in McMinn County, TN, d. 21 April 1867 in Jacksonville, AL.

John Tate, Jr. and Eliza Jane Weir were divorced after the birth of their only child.

m (3). Cynthia Hamilton (b. 23 Oct 1813 in TN, d. 13 Dec. 1897 in Desert, TX) on 17 Oct. 1839 prob. in McMinn or Monroe County, TN. (n. 59)

Children of John Tate, Jr. and Cynthia Hamilton:

15.       Robert H. Tate, b. abt. 1841 in TN, (n. 60) m. Elizabeth Cornelia Taylor (b. abt. 1841 in TN, d. aft. 1880) on 30 May 1860 in Collin County, TX, d. bef. 1868. (n. 61)

16.       Mary E. Tate, b. Apr. 1844 in TN, m. Thomas J. Smith (b. 1840 in GA, d. 1923 in TX) on 24 Dec. 1868 in Collin County, TX, d. 1923 in TX. (n. 62)

17.       John H. Tate, b. 26 Jan. 1846 in TN, m. Albertine Wilson (b. 2 Oct. 1846 in TN, d. 17 Feb. 1882 in TX) on 30 Dec. 1866 in Grayson County, TX, d. 29 Oct. 1877 in TX. (n. 63)

18.       Martha Caroline Tate, b. abt. 1848 in TN, m. William B. Patterson abt. 1870 (b. abt. 1845 in GA, d. aft. 1880), d. bef. 1893. (n. 64)

19.       William Elbert Tate, Sr., b. 24 Dec. 1849 in Monroe County, TN, m. Cynthia Ann Brown (b. 11 Dec. 1855 in TX, d. 29 Jul. 1930 in TX) on 24 Dec. 1873 in Kentucky Town, TX, d. 1 Jan 1922 in TX. (n. 65)

20.       David Blair Tate, b. 12 Nov. 1855 in TN, m. Willie Delona White (b. 25 Jul. 1875 in TX, d. 29 Jun 1961 in TX) on 17 May 1892 in Collin County, TX, d. 4 Mar. 1929 in TX. (n. 66)

 

FOURTH GENERATION: 

JAMES McDONALD TATE, b. Sept. 18, 1822, d. March 2, 1858

 

After following his father around from county to county, James McDonald Tate met Jane Catherine Pickel of Monroe County and married her on Sept. 30, 1847.  Jane Catherine Pickel (who sometimes went by Catherine Jane) was a daughter of Jonathan Pickel and a granddaughter of Christian Pickel, who served in the Augusta County, Virginia militia during the Revolutionary War and is recognized as a patriot. (n. 67)  Following their marriage, the young couple moved to nearby Roane County, TN, and began to raise a family.  In 1853, however, James decided to move to Hamilton County, (n. 68)  which had been carved out of the former Cherokee reservation some years before.  Many settlers were moving into the southeastern area of Tennessee during the mid-nineteenth-century.  Unfortunately for James, he did not live to see his family prosper in Hamilton County, as he died in 1858 at the young age of thirty-five.  James is buried in old Mitchell Cemetery, located on a hill near the intersection of Snow Hill Road and Mountain View Road just off the Lee Highway in Ooltewah, TN. (n. 69) Continuing our family tree:

 

13.  James McDonald Tate b. Sept. 18, 1822 in Overton County, TN, d. March 2, 1858 in Hamilton County, TN.

m.  Jane Catherine Pickel (b. Sept. 3, 1828 in TN, d. Feb. 7, 1883 in TN) on Sept. 30, 1847 in Monroe County, TN.

Children of James McDonald Tate and Jane Catherine Pickel:

21.       John Harvey Tate, b. Jun. 21, 1848 in TN, m. Julia Allen (b. 25 Apr 1848 in Missouri, d. 15 Jul 1928 in Chattanooga, TN) on 4 Jul 1883 in Hamilton County, TN, (n. 70) d. 4 Dec. 1901. (n. 71)

22.       Thomas S. Tate, b. Jan. 11, 1850 in TN, m. Narcissa Elizabeth Hall (b. 21 Oct. 1848, d. 16 Oct. 1907) on July 2, 1872 in TN, d. 19 May 1916 in Hamilton County, TN. (n. 72)

23.       Robert Mitchell Tate, b. 10 Sept. 1852 in TN, m. Martha Ellen Hall (b. 5 Jun 1862 near Chattanooga, TN, d. 20 Aug. 1954 in Grapevine, TX) abt. 1880 prob. in James County, TN, d. 30 Jan. 1905 in TX. (n. 73)

24.       Mary K. Tate b. Feb. 26, 1855 in TN, d. Nov. 1861. (n. 74)

 

FIFTH GENERATION:

 

THOMAS S. TATE, b. 11 Jan. 1850, d. 19 May 1916

 

While Thomas S. Tate was not the oldest son of James McDonald Tate, he was the first and oldest to have children.  Unlike his younger brother Robert, who moved to Texas, Thomas stayed in Tennessee, and is the ancestor of our Tennessee cousins.  Thomas had three children, all of whom died relatively young.  Thomas himself lived to be 66.  Continuing with our family tree:

 

22.  Thomas S. Tate, b. Jan. 11, 1850 in TN, d. 19 May 1916 in Hamilton County, TN.

m. Narcissa Elizabeth Hall (b. 21 Oct. 1848, d. 16 Oct. 1907) on July 2, 1872 in TN.

Children of Thomas S. Tate and Narcissa Elizabeth Hall:

25.       Luther Lewis Tate, b. 16 Jul. 1874 in TN, m (1). Nina Gordon Crowe (b. abt. 1885, d. 11 Jan. 1913) on 6 Oct. 1908 in TN, m (2). Fanny L. Kingsbury (b. abt. 1885, d. 19 Jan. 1931) on 1 Aug. 1918 in TN, d. 26 May 1925.

26.       Annie Pearl Tate, b. 25 Feb. 1880 in TN, m. George Franklin Smith abt. 1900, d. 6 Nov. 1909 in TN.

27.       Samuel Anderson Tate, b. 31 Dec. 1884 in TN, m. Margaret Hayes on 24 Jul. 1910, d. 4 Jan. 1919.

 

ROBERT MITCHELL TATE, (n. 75) b. 10 Sept. 1852, d. 30 Jan. 1905

 

Robert Mitchell Tate was, in a sense, the last of the pioneers in our Tate family.  In 1885, Robert left his childhood home in Ooltewah, Tennessee with his young wife Martha Ellen Hall, and moved to the Tarrant/Denton County area of Texas.  Two of Robert’s children, Arthur and Lula, were born in Tennessee, but their two younger sons, Earl and Clarence, were born in Texas.  The Tate family has deep roots in this area of Texas, where many of our family still live to this day.  Continuing our family tree:

 

23.       Robert Mitchell Tate, b. 10 Sept. 1852 in TN, d. 30 Jan. 1905 in TX.

m.  Martha Ellen Hall (b. 5 Jun. 1862 near Chattanooga, TN, d. 20 Aug. 1954 in Grapevine, TX), abt. 1880 prob. in James County, TN.

Children of Robert Mitchell Tate and Martha Ellen Hall:

                        28.       James Arthur Tate, b. 28 Sept. 1881 in Ooltewah, TN, m. Laura Dolah Haire (b. 29 Jan. 1882 in Collin County, TX, d. 2 Sept. 1971 in Grapevine, TX) abt. 1902 in Grapevine, TX, d. 20 Feb. 1967 in Grapevine, TX.

29.       Lula May Tate, b. 1 Jun 1884 prob. in James County, TN, m (1). Jess Ed Steve Crawford (b. 9 Feb. 1881 in Shiloh, TX, d. 26 Dec. 1910 in Shiloh, TX), m (2). William White Ratliff (b. 8 Dec. 1870 in TN, d. 12 Jul 1962 in Fort Worth, TX), d. 10 Jun. 1924.

30.       Earl Otto Tate, b. 18 Jan. 1887 in Tarrant County, TX, m. Myrtle Esther Maud Nowlin (b. 12 Mar. 1889 in Smithfield, TX, d. 3 Jul. 1961 in Tarrant County, TX) on 5 Jul. 1908 in TX, d. 6 Nov. 1955 in Grapevine, TX.

31.       Clarence Mitchell Tate, b. 11 Nov. 1888 in Tarrant County, TX, m. Zella Pearl Hallford (b. abt. 1893 in TX, d. aft. 1943), d. 5 Feb. 1943 in Grapevine, TX.                

SIXTH GENERATION

 

25.       Luther Lewis Tate, b. 16 Jul. 1874 in TN, d. 26 May 1925.

m (1). Nina Gordon Crowe (b. abt. 1885, d. 11 Jan. 1913) on 6 Oct. 1908 in TN.

Children of Luther Lewis Tate and Nina Gordon Crowe:

32.       Gordon Yarnell Tate, Sr., b. 23 Aug. 1909 in TN, d. 1963 in Hamilton County, TN.

33.       Lewis Russell Tate, b. 13 May 1911 in TN, d. 17 Apr. 1992 in Chattanooga, TN.

34.       Luther Marshall Tate, b. 4 Jan. 1913 in TN, d. May 1979 in Chattanooga, TN.

m (2). Fanny L. Kingsbury (b. abt. 1885, d. 19 Jan. 1931) on 1 Aug. 1918 in TN.

26.       Annie Pearl Tate, b. 25 Feb. 1880 in TN, d. 6 Nov. 1909 in TN.

m. George Franklin Smith abt. 1900.

Child of Annie Pearl Tate and George Franklin Smith:

            35.       Ruth Tate Smith, m. Lester Patton.

28.       James Arthur Tate, b. 28 Sept. 1881 in Ooltewah, TN, d. 20 Feb. 1967 in Grapevine, TX.

m. Laura Dolah Haire (b. 29 Jan. 1882 in Collin County, TX, d. 2 Sept. 1971 in Grapevine, TX), abt. 1902 in TX.

Children of James Arthur Tate and Laura Dolah Haire:

36.       Ardo Tate, b. 12 Oct. 1903 in TX, d. 17 Dec. 1906 in TX.

                        37.       Arvel Mitchell Tate, b. 28 May 1907 in TX, m. Hazel Pearl Neal (b. 31 Aug. 1911 in Comanche County, TX, d. 5 Jan. 1971 in Tarrant County, TX) on 6 Oct. 1928 in TX, d. 3 May 1983 in Grapevine, TX.

                        38.       James Doris Tate, b. 23 Oct 1908 in TX, m. Georgia Katherine Thutt (b. 15 Feb. 1915, d. 24 Jul. 1986), d. 15 Aug. 1941 in Denton County, TX.

                        39.       Jessie May Tate, b. 28 Jul. 1912 in Grapevine, TX, d. 2 Jan. 1916 in Grapevine, TX.

                        40.       Arthur Hurmon Tate, b. 23 Oct. 1915 in TX, m. Clella Mae Whisenhunt (b. 13 Aug. 1915, d. 13 Oct. 2003 in TX), d. 12 Jun. 1973 in Bay County, FL.

                        41.       Living.

29.       Lula May Tate, b. 1 Jun 1884 prob. in James County, TN, d. 10 Jun. 1924.

m (1). Jess Ed Steve Crawford (b. 9 Feb. 1881 in Shiloh, TX, d. 26 Dec. 1910 in Shiloh, TX).

Child of Lula May Tate and Jess Ed Steve Crawford:

            42.       Jess Howard Crawford, b. 27 Jul 1910 in TX, d. 10 Mar. 1911 in TX.

m (2). William White Ratliff (b. 8 Dec. 1870 in TN, d. 12 Jul 1962 in Fort Worth, TX).

Children of Lula May Tate and William White Ratliff:

                        43.       Living.

44.       Wallace White Ratliff, b. 12 Sep. 1916, m. Mary Doris Pearson, d. 16 Dec. 1991.

45.       James Earl Ratliff, b. 16 Mar 1919 in TX, m. Freda Kate Gordon (b. 8 Jan 1917 in London, England, d. 8 Dec. 1962 in Houston, TX) abt. 1944, d. 2 Mar. 1973 in Houston, TX.

30.       Earl Otto Tate, b. 18 Jan. 1887 in Tarrant County, TX, d. 6 Nov. 1955 in Grapevine, TX.

m.  Myrtle Esther Maud Nowlin (b. 12 Mar. 1889 in Smithfield, TX, d. 3 Jul. 1961 in TX) on 5 Jul. 1908 in TX.

Children of Earl Otto Tate and Myrtle Esther Maud Nowlin:

                        46.       Gordon Douglas Tate, b. 24 Dec. 1909 in Denton County, TX, m. Annie Louise Bennett (b. 2 Sept. 1910, d. 29 Apr. 1993) on 29 Jul. 1934 in TX, d. 23 Jun. 1968 in Grapevine, Tarrant County, TX.

47.       Erman Granville Tate, b. 13 May 1915 in Denton County, TX, m (1). Mary Ruth Starr (b. 25 Nov. 1916 in TX, d. 7 Feb. 1975 in Dallas County, TX) on 25 May 1940 in Grapevine, TX, m (2). Helen Frances Painter (b. 30 Apr. 1915 in Denton County, TX, d. 28 Jun. 1994) on 2 Feb. 1977 in Denton County, TX, d. 25 Apr. 1980 in Denton County, TX.

48.       Weldon Clois Tate, b. 18 Dec. 1916 in Denton County, TX, d. 18 Sept. 1993 in Tarrant County, TX.

49.       Dorothy Dee Tate, b. 28 Dec. 1918 in Denton County, TX, m. Owen Wilson Lawrence Barnett (b. 5 Aug. 1916 in TX, d. 17 Aug. 1975 in Tarrant County, TX) abt. 1936 in TX, d. 11 Aug. 2000 in Colleyville, TX.

50.       Marjorie Tate, b. 5 Aug. 1921 in Grapevine, Tarrant County, TX, d. 18 Aug. 1921 in TX.

51.       Ellen Marie Tate, b. 4 Mar. 1924 in Denton County, TX, d. 18 Apr. 1924 in Lewisville, Denton County, TX.

31.       Clarence Mitchell Tate, b. 11 Nov. 1888 in Tarrant County, TX, d. 5 Feb. 1943 in Grapevine, TX.      

m. Zella Pearl Hallford (b. abt. 1893 in TX, d. aft. 1943).

Children of Clarence Mitchell Tate and Zella Pearl Hallford:

52.       Robert Eli Tate, b. 3 Oct. 1913 in TX, d. 7 Dec. 1989.

53.       Emmet Ray “Bunk” Tate, b. 23 Apr. 1915 in TX, d. 1 Mar. 1992.

54.       Edna Ruth Tate, b. 2 Jan. 1919 in TX, d. 23 Dec 2004.

55.       Living.

56.       James Earl “Jimmy” Tate, b. 27 Jul. 1923 in TX, d. 22 Mar. 1943 in Harlingen, TX.

57.       Living.

58.       Billy Joe Tate, b. 11 Apr. 1933 in Brown County, TX, , m. Jacqueline Ann Watkins, d. 30 Apr. 1975 in Tarrant County, TX.

                                                                                                             

NOTES

 

I wish to thank all those who have helped me in my research.  Our distant cousin Martha Southernwood has worked tirelessly to trace the early Tate family history; she has provided me with extensive documentation and pointed me in the right direction.  Ann Blomquist, a professional researcher, also provided helpful information on the early Tates, as has our cousin Les Tate, who is  a direct descendant of old Samuel as proven by deed records and a DNA match.  I am grateful to our cousin Gordon Y. Tate of Tennessee for sending me a copy of the family history pages from the James M. Tate Family Bible, providing much useful information, and graciously hosting me in Chattanooga, and to Becky Tate Edinger for inviting me to join her Tate genealogy internet group.  I am especially grateful to Freida Carter for giving me the William Elbert Tate, Sr. Family Bible.  I would also like to thank the following cousins for the information they have provided on later Tate generations:  Twila Allen, Stephen Foster, Doris Gibson, Robert Ratliff, Merrill Dean Stacy, Laura Mae Sword, Clarence Mitchell Tate, Jr., Elaine Tate, Johnny Tate, Randall Tate, and Sandra Kay Tate.          

 

1)  Samuel moved to Claiborne County in 1797, although it was then part of Grainger County.  See Deed from William Hord to Samuel Tate, Grainger County, TN, June 9, 1797 (Deed Book A) (transferring the same tract of land John Tate, Sr., would later inherit from his father and stating that Samuel Tate was “of Lee County and State of Virginia”).  Samuel was still living in Claiborne in 1803, see Deed from Samuel Tate to Thomas Hoskins, Claiborne County, TN, Feb. 19, 1803 (Deed Book A, p. 63), and probably died there.

2)  John and Samuel Tate were admitted to administer Samuel Tate’s estate in Claiborne County on August 26, 1812.  It is therefore likely that Samuel Tate died in 1812.

3)  See Deed from John Tate, Sr. to John & Robert Tate, Overton County, TN, Jan. 5, 1826 (Deed Book E, p. 568).  This deed mentions a “tract, situate in the County of Claibourne, in the Eastern end of the . . . state of Tennessee . . . that descended to me as heir to Samuel Tate, my deceased father.”  This deed proves the line of succession from Samuel Tate to John Tate, Sr., to John Tate, Jr. of Overton County.

4)  See discussion below.

5)  History of Texas, Together With a Biographical History of Tarrant and Parker Counties (Chicago, 1895), p. 432.  This short biography of W.E. Tate was written during his lifetime, and is generally correct in its facts about the Tate family, suggesting that the author talked to W.E. Tate directly.  W.E. Tate probably learned about his Scots-Irish ancestry from his father John Tate, Jr., who in term could have learned it from old Samuel Tate himself, who may have been the emigrant from Ireland.  Thus, this reference is strong evidence of a Scots-Irish connection.

6)  See Deed from Granville to Samuel Tate, Rowan County, NC, Aug. 27, 1762 (Deed Book 5, p. 134); Deed from Samuel Tate and wife Darcus to Hugh Montgomery, March 30, 1767 (Deed Book 6, p. 385).  These two deeds transfer the same tract of land, 577 acres on the banks of the Yadkin River on a branch of Dutchman’s Creek.  Because Samuel Tate did not purchase any more property in Rowan County after 1767, it is likely that he left Rowan County after selling this tract (assuming this is our Samuel).

7)  Deed from Samuel Tate and wife Darcus to Hugh Montgomery, Rowan County, NC, March 30, 1767 (Deed Book 6, p. 385).

8)  Overton County, TN, Circuit Court Minutes, Sept. Term 1816, p. 59.

9)  Approximately 80 women named Dorcas or some variant thereof appear in the 1790 Census, 15 of them from North Carolina (no Dorcas Tate).  By way of comparison, there are over 1,000 women named Hannah in that census, 56 from North Carolina; and more than 2,000 women named Elizabeth, almost 400 from North Carolina.  There are only four men named  Samuel Tate (or Tait) in the 1790 census, none of them from North Carolina.  (The census did not include Virginia or the area of present-day Tennessee.)

10)  http://gesswhoto.com/olden-daze/index31.html.

11)  http://www.logansfort.org/1775.html.

12)  Rowan County, NC Militia List, 1759.

13)  http://www.thescenicroute.com/cmterrell/van_cleef/d547.htm.

14)  This is supported by Ledger A of the Henderson Company, which indicates that Samuel Tate was “from Carolina.”  Rev. John D. Shane, “The Henderson Company Ledger,” in Filson Club History Quarterly, vol. 21 (1947), pp. 24-25.  This ledger, as edited by Shane, indicates that Samuel Tate once escaped from Indians by running away in a creek, which was later named Tate’s Creek and situated in what became Madison County, Kentucky.  Id.  According to George Washington Ranck, Boonesborough:  Its Founding, Pioneer Struggles, Indian Experiences, Transylvania Days, and Revolutionary Annals (Louisville:  John P. Morton & Co. 1901), the Samuel Tate who fled from the Indians was “of Powell’s Valley,” where the land Samuel Tate later purchased in Grainger County was situated.  See id. (citing an article by Nathaniel Hart, Jr. in the Frankfort Commonwealth, July 25, 1838); Deed from William Hord to Samuel Tate, Grainger County, TN, June 9, 1797 (Deed Book A).

15)  John Mack Faragher, Daniel Boone: The Life and Legend of an American Pioneer (Holt & Co. 1992), p. 49.

16)  Id. at 55.

17)  The only evidence I have discovered that weighs against this assumption is a reference to Samuel Tate as being “already settled in Madison County” at the arrival of the Rev. Andrew Tribble, who founded Tate’s Creek Baptist Church in Madison County, KY in 1786.  See http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/BOONE/2005-11/1131294499.  Since our Samuel Tate had moved to Washington County, NC by 1778, it is unlikely that he would have been “settled” in Madison County (near the center of present-day Kentucky) in 1786.  However, no Tate or Tait appears in the Madison County tax list for 1792.  It is not inconceivable that Tribble met our Samuel Tate several years before founding the church, when he was still in Kentucky; or this could be a different Samuel Tate who was not in Boone’s original party (but perhaps a relative of our old Samuel).

18)  The DAR marker is probably mistaken in referring to Samuel’s son as Samuel Tate, Jr.  There is no evidence for old Samuel having a son Samuel Tate, Jr. born before 1780, although he may  have had such a son born after that date.  Only one Samuel Tate (owning a great deal of land) is listed in the 1787 tax list for Washington County.  The Samuel Tate who was a co-executor with John in 1812 may have been born after 1780; or he could have been John’s son, or perhaps a son of John’s brother Robert.

19)  http://www.rootsweb.com/~kycampbe/PioneersFtBoonesborough.htm.

20)  Pat Alderman, The Overmountain Men (Overmountain Press 1986), pp. 35, 47.

21)  Washington County, NC County Court Minutes, Aug. 1778 (p. 38).

22)  Id., May 1781 (p. 134).

23)  Id., Aug. 1781 (p. 142).

24)  Id., Aug. 1789 (pp. 401B02).

25)  Deed from John and Ruth Hoskins to Samuel Tate, Washington County, NC, April 10, 1783 (Deed Book 1, p. 111).

26)  See supra note 1.

27)  Compare Deed from John and Ruth Ford to Samuel Tate, Washington County, NC, June 1, 1791, with Deed from Samuel Tate to George Logan, Carter County, TN, Apr. 27, 1798.  The two deeds describe the same land.  The 1791 deed identifies Samuel Tate as being a resident of Washington County, while the 1798 deed identifies Samuel Tate as a resident of Grainger County.  We know that our Samuel Tate purchased land in Grainger County (present-day Claiborne County) in 1797.  Thus, the Washington County Samuel Tate must be ours.

28)  Penelope Johnson Allen, Tennessee Soldiers in the Revolution (Genealogical Publishing Co., reprinted 1996), p. 30.

29)  Alderman, The Overmountain Men, pp. 119, 126.

30)  Samuel’s wife Dorcas was probably dead by 1788, when Samuel executed a deed to Jacob Black.   Deed from Samuel Tate to Jacob Black, Washington County Deed Book 2, p. 301.  If Dorcas had been alive at that time, she would have been a party to the deed in order to extinguish her right of dower in the property.

31)  Surry County, NC Tax List, 1774 (Samuel Tate & son Robert Tate, 2 polls); French Tipton list of Boonesborough pioneers; Washington County Tax List, 1787; Deed from John and Ruth Hoskins to Samuel Tate, Washington County, NC, Apr. 10, 1783 (witnessed by Robert Tate).  Surry County, NC was formed from Rowan County in 1770; thus the Samuel Tate in the 1774 Surry County tax list may be ours.  However, the Samuel Tate in Surry County apparently married Amey Burke after the Revolutionary War, and our Samuel seems to have been unmarried after moving to Washington County (see Deed from Samuel Tate to Jacob Black, 29 Apr. 1788, Washington County; if Samuel were married his wife would most likely have been named as co-grantor).  If our Samuel did have a son Robert, he may be the father of the Samuel Tate of Bibb County, Alabama who, together with Robert Tate and John Tate, Jr., sold old Samuel’s tract of land in Claiborne County in 1832.  See Deed from Samuel Tate, John Tate, and Robert Tate to Daniel Sowder, Claiborne County Deed Book K, p. 176.  It is also possible, however, that this younger Samuel was the son of our Samuel rather than his grandson.  Samuel Tate of Bibb County was not a son of John Tate, Sr., as discussed below, but he must have been a descendant of our old Samuel in order to inherit a share of his property in Claiborne.

32)  I have seen references to a John Tate, Jr. in the Washington County court records from the late 1700s.  This John Tate is not likely to be our John Tate, as his father was Samuel, not John (although “Jr.” was sometimes used in the eighteenth century to designate the younger of two men even when the elder was the younger man’s uncle or cousin, not his father).

33)  Deed from State of North Carolina to John Tate, Washington County, NC, Nov. 17, 1790 (Deed Book 7, p. 207).

34)  Deed from John and Elizabeth Tate to Richard White, Carter County, TN, Mar. 11, 1797.

35)  See supra note 8.

36)  See id.  John testified that he had these legitimate children “previous to his intermarriage with his present wife.”

37)  http://www.rootsweb.com/~tnwashin/marriages/marr1787_99.htm#T.

38)  Carthage Gazette and Friend of the People, Apr. 12, 1811.

39)  1820 U.S. Census, Overton County, TN, p. 18 (Ancestry.com img. 18).

40)  See, e.g., deeds to Thomas Simpson and Alfred Tate.

41)  Ann Blomquist has a sixth child, Sarah, born abt. 1808, but I do not know what evidence this is based on.

42)  See supra note 8; Will of Robert Tate, McMinn County, Tennessee, 17 Nov. 1836, mentions Dorcas Simpson, sister of Robert.

43)  An entry in the Overton County court minutes from 1818 records a transfer of property from “Thomas Simpson executor of Samuel Tate deceased to John Tate, Sr.”  This is most likely John Tate, Sr.’s legitimized son Samuel Tate.  In 1826, John Tate, Sr. conveyed property to all of his children, or their spouses, except for his legitimized son Samuel.  Overton County Deed Book E, pp. 474 (Alfred), 502 (Vincent Tate and John Reagan, husband of Mary Tate Reagan), 564 (Thomas Simpson, husband of Dorcas Simpson), 565 (Robert Tate), 568 (John Jr. and Robert Tate).  Moreover, the Will of Robert Tate, 17 Nov. 1836, does not mention Samuel; either he was dead or Robert did not see fit to provide him anything in his will. 

44)  Washington County marriage record.

45)  Robert Tate’s will of 1836, supra note 42, states that Vincent Benham Tate is deceased.  In her AFT posting, Ann Blomquist gives his approximate birth date, wife’s name, and approximate date of marriage.

46)  Census records say that the Rev. John Tate, Jr. was born in Tennessee, which fits with what we know about his father’s whereabouts at the time.  Although the Rev. John Tate’s tombstone says that he was 75 when he died, which would mean a birth year of 1793 or 1794, the William Elbert Tate, Sr. Family Bible gives a birth date of 29 Feb. 1796, as does the 1895 biography of W.E. Tate cited supra note 5.  Since the Rev. John’s son was likely to remember his birthday, and 1796 was a leap year, I have assumed that the Bible and biography are correct.  The census records, interestingly, suggest a birth year of 1797/98, which might offer further support for the later date (it is more likely that the census records were off by a year or two than off by four years).

47)  Birth dates from the Samuel William Tate Family Bible; other information taken from Ann Blomquist’s AFT posting.  Alfred Carter Tate had many descendants, who are not yet included on this tree.

48)  Robert Tate’s will was recorded 30 Dec. 1837 in Wilson County, Tennessee (spelled Tait in will filing but Tate in inventory filing), although he died in McMinn County.  Approximate birth date based on 1820 U.S. Census, Overton County, TN, p. 264 (indexed under John Late).

49)  http://www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/churches/CaveSpTN.htm.

50)  1830 U.S. Census, McMinn County, TN, p. 174 (Ancestry.com img. 82); 1840 U.S. Census, McMinn County, TN, p. 137 (Ancestry.com img. 125).

51)  1850 U.S. Census, Monroe County, TN, p. 20 (Ancestry.com img. 40).

52)  1860 U.S. Census, Collin County, TX, Precinct 6, p. 77 (Ancestry.com img. 5).  John Tate, Jr. moved to Texas years before his grandson Robert Mitchell Tate.  I am not certain whether James McDonald Tate was still alive when his father moved to Texas.  John Tate, Jr. has many descendants in Texas, who were not aware until recently that there is another Tate branch in Grapevine descended from John’s grandson Robert Mitchell Tate.

53)  http://www.cumberland.org/hfcpc/minister/TateJ.htm.

54)  In 1820, John seems to have owned one young male slave.  1820 U.S. Census, Overton County, TN, p. 5 (Ancestry.com img. 5).  In 1830, John owned one male slave between 10-24 years old, 3 female slaves under 10, and 1 female slave between 10-24.  In 1840, John owned no slaves.  However, in 1860 in Collin County, Texas, John owned four male slaves (21, 17, 12, and 2) and two female slaves (11 and 5).  The 21-year old-male and the 11-year-old female were listed as mulattoes.

55)  James McDonald Tate, youngest son of John Tate, Jr. and his wife ___ McDonald, was born Sept. 18, 1822.  See James M. Tate Family Bible (copies in possession of Gordon Y. Tate).  A few weeks later, John McDonald left property to to the benefit of “Nancy Jane Tate, Puggy Simson Tate, and James McDonnold Tate, children of John Tate Junior.”  Deed from John McDonald to the interest of Nancy Jane Tate and others, Overton County, TN, Oct. 7, 1822.  The best explanation for this generosity is that John McDonald was the grandfather of these children, and his daughter had recently died, probably from complications of childbirth.

56)  Rev. John Tate Will, Collin County, TX; 1850 U.S. Census, Johnson County, AR, Perry Township, p. 152; 1860 U.S. Census, Grayson County, TX.

57)  Dates are from the James M. Tate Family Bible.  This is the father of Robert Mitchell Tate and Thomas S. Tate.  In records from Hamilton County, and in the James M. Tate Family Bible, James’s middle name is always abbreviated as “M.”  Because James was buried in Mitchell Cemetery, and his son was named Robert Mitchell Tate, our family once assumed that James’s middle name was also Mitchell.  As discussed infra note 75, however, Robert’s middle name Mitchell probably came from his mother’s side, and the fact that James is buried in Mitchell Cemetery is likely to be just a coincidence.  My research has led me to the conviction that James’s middle name was McDonald, and that he was the son of the Rev. John Tate, Jr.  First, it is clear that John Tate, Jr. had a son James McDonald Tate.  This son was born after the 1820 census of Overton County, but before Oct. 7, 1822, when he is mentioned in a deed.  We know that our James M. Tate was born Sept. 18, 1822, which fits perfectly into what we know of James McDonald Tate.  Second, the Rev. John Tate’s son James McDonald Tate was still alive in 1836, when he is mentioned in Robert Tate’s will, and was living with his father in 1840 in McMinn County according to the census.  By 1850, however, James McDonald Tate was no longer living with his father, and James was deceased in 1868 when John Tate, Jr. wrote his will.  This also fits with what we know of our James M. Tate:  he died in 1858.  Finally, it is important to note that the Rev. John Tate, Jr. was living in Monroe County in 1850, in the same area as the Pickel family.  Our James M. Tate married Jane Catherine Pickel in Monroe County in 1847.

When one considers all the evidence, it seems clear that James McDonald Tate, son of the Rev. John Tate, Jr., and our James M. Tate are one and the same person.  Of the Tates living in eastern Tennessee in the mid-1800s, only the Rev. John Tate could be the father of our James M. Tate.  If our James M. Tate was not a son of the Rev. John Tate, then his father must have escaped the notice of census takers for decades.  The only way to make sense of the evidence is to assume that our James was a son of the Rev. John Tate.  In 2007, this assumption was confirmed by DNA testing, which showed a close match between two descendants of James McDonald Tate and a known descendant of Samuel Tate of Claiborne County, TN.

58)  From the AFT posting of Ann Blomquist.

59)  William Elbert Tate, Sr. Family Bible (in the possession of Joshua C. Tate); newspaper clipping inside William Elbert Tate, Sr. Family Bible.  The Bible says her birth year was 1814, whereas the newspaper clipping says 1813.  The Bible is probably correct as it fits better with the census records.

60)  See 1850 Monroe County, TN Census, supra note 51.

61)  1880 Hunt County, TX Census, Precinct 1, Dist. 64; Collin County Marriage Record; Rev. John Tate, Jr. Will.

62)  Id.; Collin County, TX Marriage Record; 1900 U.S. Census, Fannin County, TX, J.P. 3, Dist. 68; Crossroads Cemetery, Collin County, TX.  Ann Blomquist has a son Samuel W. Tate born between Robert and Mary, but he is not attested in census records, and she gives no source.

63)  Id.; Grayson County, TX Marriage Record; Mount Carmel Cemetery Listing, Hunt County, TX.

64)  Id.; 1860 Collin County, TX Census, supra note 52; Will of Cynthia Tate, Mar. 15, 1893, 1880 U.S. Census, Baylor County, TX, Precinct 1, Dist. 182.

65)  William Elbert Tate, Sr. Family Bible; 1860 Collin County, TX Census, supra note 52.

66)  Id.; Genforum postings by Vera Leisure (28 Jun. & 17 Aug. 1999).

67)  Joshua C. Tate application for membership in the Society of the Sons of the American Revolution.

68)  See Deed from James Johnson to James M. Tate, Hamilton County, TN, Dec. 8, 1853 (online at www.hctgs.org).

69)  I visited this cemetery with Gordon Y. Tate, Jr. on May 25, 2003, where we found James M. Tate’s tombstone.  The cemetery had recently been surveyed, and neighbors said that the cemetery might be moved soon.

70)  Birthdate from James M. Tate Family Bible.  For marriage, see 1900 U.S. Census, Hamilton County, TN, 14th Civ. Dist., ED#67, p. 182 (Ancestry.com img. 5); Hamilton County, TN, Marriage Book 4, p. 164.

71)  Obituary of John Harvey Tate.

72)  James M. Tate Family Bible.

73)  Birthdate from James M. Tate Family Bible and tombstone record at Flower Mound (see http://www.rootsweb.com/~txdenton/cemeteries/flowermound/page1.htm).  Marriage date based on first child James Arthur, born in 1881.  Date of death based on tombstone record.  Martha Ellen Hall’s maiden name is attested in James Arthur Tate’s birth certificate and a clipping from a Grapevine newspaper from the 1950s.

While Robert Mitchell Tate and his brother Thomas S. Tate both married girls named Hall, their wives were not sisters.  Martha Ellen Hall’s sisters were named Margaret, Malinda, Sara, Eva, and Mary, as shown by the obituary of Margaret E. Hall Varnell in the Chattanooga Times, Aug. 8, 1928.  See also Letter from Grady L. Poe to Gordon Tate, 22 Mar. 1950, listing the known sisters of Gordon’s grandmother as Mary, Malindie, Addie, and Maggie.  (Addie and Eva seem to have been different names or nicknames for the same woman.  Martha also had an older half-brother named Sam Hall who moved to Oklahoma.)  This Hall family is attested in the 1870 U.S. Census for Hamilton County, TN, Red Clay Georgia P.O., p. 630 (Ancestry.com img. 257).  Census records show that Martha Ellen Hall and her sisters were daughters of William Henry Hall and his wife Harriet Heaton.  (See Margaret E. Hall Varnell death certificate, online at http://www.hctgs.org/DeathCertificates/death_varnell_margaret.jpg, for Harriet’s maiden name.)   By contrast, Narcissa Hall who married Thomas S. Tate was a daughter of Lewis Hall.  See 1860 U.S. Census, Hamilton County, TN, p. 28a, available online at www.hctgs.org.  Thus, these two Halls had different fathers.  It is not known if they were related, but Hall was a very common surname in the South, so there may have been no connection between Narcissa Hall and Martha Ellen Hall apart from their having married two Tate brothers.

74)  James M. Tate Family Bible.

75)  Robert was the first Tate to have the middle name of Mitchell, which has become a tradition in our family (see the many Tates in subsequent generations whose middle name is Mitchell).  While the source of this name is not known, it almost certainly came from Robert’s mother’s side.  Robert’s mother, Jane Catherine Pickel, had a brother Lewis Mitchell Pickel, who moved to Boulder County, Colorado and is buried at Columbia Cemetery.  See http://www.ci.boulder.co.us/website/parks/prk_www_columbia/columbia.htm?IDNUM’4761.  Jane also had a brother named James H. Pickel, see Monroe County, TN, Chancery Court Records, #555; 1880 U.S. Census, Monroe County, TN, Dist. 1, p. 11A (Ancestry.com img. 21), whose son James Mitchell Pickel moved to Denton County, TX and is buried at Pilot Point Cemetery.  See http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/tx/denton/cemeteries/ppcempz.txt.  For whatever reason, the name Mitchell was popular among the Pickels, and Jane gave her son Robert the same middle name as her brother and her nephew.