Harry Weill
2005

Harry Weill, a prominent local attorney who enjoyed a legendary career of more than 60 years and who spread a unique zest for life wherever he went, died Wednesday, June 22, 2005, at a local hospital. He was 88. The senior partner in the Chattanooga law firm of Weill, Durand and Long, he began his passionate pursuit of law in 1940 and, with the exception of time spent in military service, never left or retired from the profession he loved.
   During the long span of his career, he also devoted his energy and leadership talent to a number of civic and religious organizations and community endeavors and enlivened countless social gathering with his renowned storytelling skills.
   An avid lifelong skier, he was tackling slopes in North and South America and Europe into his 88th year, making these trips with area ski clubs or with his children and grandchildren in tow. A devoted family man, the trips became a high point of the Weill family activities calendar.
   A Chattanooga native, he attended McCallie School , graduating in 1932 at the young age of 15. He received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Virginia in 1936 and a law degree from Harvard University Law School in 1940. After graduating from Harvard, he returned to Chattanooga , where he joined the law firm of Joseph Roberts and accepted an appointment as legal counsel to one of the county’s World War II Selective Service boards. Instead of granting himself an indefinite deferment from military service as he might have, he drafted himself into the Army among Hamilton County ’s first group of inductees.
   During World War II, he served first in military intelligence, then received flight training to become an Army Air Corps B29 pilot, flying bombing missions from Northwest Field in Guam . After the war, he returned permanently to his hometown and the legal profession. He married Marcelle Baum of Birmingham , Ala. , in December 1947, and the couple had three children, Lige, Flossie and Audrey.
   Harry Weill held a number of posts, including president of the Junior Chamber of Commerce, an officer of Kiwanis Club, a board director of Girls’ Club of Chattanooga, a member of the Estate Planning Council of Chattanooga, a founder of Bank of Rossville and president of Mizpah Congregation.
   During his more than 60 years of legal service, he was a member of the local, state and national bar associations and a member of the Chattanooga and Tennessee Trial Lawyers Association. He was admitted to the Supreme Court of Tennessee and U.S. Supreme Court and was a member of the American Judicature Society.
   For most of his six decades of legal practice, he worked from offices in the Volunteer Building in downtown Chattanooga . The firm, which includes Flossie Weill, Ira Long Jr., Whitney Durand and Bill Bolen, recently moved two blocks away to new offices in the Tallan Building .
   He was preceded in death by his mother and father, Elsie Wertheimer Weill and David Robert Weill; his brother, Dr. David Robert Weill Jr. of Pittsburgh , Pa. ; and his sister, Betty Rose Long of Chattanooga .
   Survivors include his wife, Marcelle Baum Weill; three children, Lige Harry Weill of Knoxville , Flossie Weill of Chattanooga and Audrey Weill Bolson of Mercer Island, Wash.; son-in-law, David Bolson of Mercer Island ; four grandchildren, Johnny Shoaf and Alex Shoaf, both of Chattanooga , and Philip Bolson and Harry Bolson, both of Mercer Island ; and several nieces and nephews.

 Funeral services will be held at 10:30 a.m. today, June 24, in the Temple sanctuary at Mizpah Congregation at 923 McCallie Ave. with Rabbi Joshua Lief officiating.
   A private interment ceremony for the family will follow at Mizpah Cemetery .
   Pallbearers are Dr. Ira Long, David Bolson, Barry Parker, Dr. Jeffrey Gefter and the grandsons.
   The body will lie in state at the Temple one hour before the service.
   The family asks that contributions be made to a favorite charity in lieu of flowers. Arrangements are by J. Avery Bryan Funeral Home, 747 McCallie Ave.
The Chattanooga Times Free Press, Friday, June 24, 2005.